Category Archives: roofing

Coruline Roofing

Roof sheeting: What material should I use?

From corrugated to coroline, we look at your options when it comes to choosing clear, coloured and plastic sheeting for your new prefab structure.

There is nothing quite as important as the roof over our heads.

Neglecting your tiles, choosing unfit material or settling for poor installation can only lead to one thing – a leaky roof, that’s not fit for purpose.

And it’s not just our homes we have to think of when it comes to roofing. Sheds, garages, bike huts and porches all use different forms of roofing, and are all equally as important when it comes to keeping the weather at bay.

So, if you’re thinking of building a new outdoor structure, where do you start when it comes to the roof? Here, we look at the different easy-to-install material options available to help you choose the right fit for your frame.

Option one: Corrugated sheets

You won’t have to walk too far down the street to spot a bike shed or garden porch fitted with corrugated sheeting for the roof.

But way back in the early 1800s when it was first invented, corrugated galvanised iron – to give it its proper name – was widely used for everything from warehouses and factories to simple homes and water tanks.

Originally made from wrought iron, corrugated sheets are now usually made from steel. And their popularity remains thanks to unique qualities, which include:

• Lightweight yet heavy duty by nature
• Easy and simple to install
• Cost-effective and affordable when bought in both large and small batches
• Corrosion-resistant
• Easy to transport.

Corrugated sheets are available in a range of widths, lengths and thickness – perfect for fitting the materials to your job, not the other way around. Corrugated sheeting can also be used for completing a variety of structures and will stand the test of time.

Option two: Polycarbonate sheets

Polycarbonate roof sheets are essentially made from shatterproof, strong and durable plastic. Due to the see-through properties, temperature resistance and impact resistance, polycarbonate is ideal for building greenhouses, cold frames, shed windows and simple wall structures.

The benefits of using polycarbonate sheeting include:

• Strong, tough and durable even in poor weather conditions
• Impressive heat and sound insulation power
• Easy to install
• Cost-effective due to both the material price and the fact that you can use lighter support structures.

Polycarbonate roof and wall sheeting is also cut to exactly to your requirements, making it even easier to install.

Option three: Coroline and onduline sheets

If you are hoping to build a structure with eco credentials, you won’t have to look much further than coroline sheeting / onduline sheeting.

Made from recycled cellulose fibres – which are saturated with bitumen under intense pressure and heat – coroline and onduline are great options for anyone looking to be kind to the environment, while still getting all the benefit of a durable material.

As well as utilising recycled material, these sheeting options also benefit from being:

• Easy to install
• Durable and strong
• Lightweight and easy to handle
• Multi-use, including for summer houses, sheds and workshops
• Able to withstand high weathering
• Affordable

Additionally, you won’t have to forget about style when you opt for substance. Coroline and onduline roof and wall sheets are available in a range of different shades and finishes, so you can add a little colour to your new shed, bike port or porch – you could even add green while being green (see what we did there?).

As well as colours you can also find transparent coroline or onduline sheets if you want to let in a little light.

box profile roof sheet

How To: Cutting The Perfect Box Profile Roof Sheet

Throughout the year we’ll be posting a number of super useful “How To” articles to help you out with some of the most common D.I.Y related questions that we come across! For this weeks’ we’re going to give you the low-down on how to cut a box profile roof sheet for the – potential – arrival of the better weather and the chance to replace any damaged roofing sheets. So now you can finally get around to putting them up!

But… how best to go about cutting what can be a tricky and cumbersome material? For us, it’s all about breaking it down into three easy pieces.

Where to do your cutting?

Although the temptation may be strong to cut in situ, we strongly advise not to as there are some very serious health and safety issues to consider, not to mention your ability to craft the perfect cut. We recommend placing your box profile roof sheet face down on a flat surface with padded supports underneath to raise it off the ground and also avoid any damage to their structure caused by unyielding supports.

What tools do you need to cut a box profile roof sheet?

When it comes to tools, the overriding rule is to use something that creates as little heat as possible to avoid damaging the coating on the sheet. For longer straight cuts, we recommend using a fine tooth metal cutting blade on your circular saw, producing a ‘cold cut’. When it comes to the niggley small cuts and openings, we would plump for a jigsaw or reciprocating saw, although the use of nibblers and angle grinders (with a small tooth blade / disc) are often used in the roofing trade.

Any other business?

And hey, you’re going to need to source out the best quality and value for money materials for the job! We’ve got you covered on this one too with our vast range of box profile sheetsscrews,eave fillers and everything else you’d need for the job!

Do you have any top tips for cutting a box profile roof sheet? Share your tips in the comments with us!

types of corrugated roofing

Know Your DIY: Common Types of Corrugated Roofing and their Uses

Whether you’re starting your very first project or you’re a seasoned hobbyist, the world of DIY can be overwhelming. It’s likely you’ll have a lot of questions, like: what’s the difference between Onduline and Coroline? What are the benefits of using a galvanised roofing sheet?

Don’t worry – we’re on hand with our handy guide to get you started. Find out more about the most common types of corrugated roofing and their uses.


Galvanised roofing sheets are a simple and speedy fix – offering enough flexibility to cover projects of all levels – from a DIY project to a much larger commercial job. These roofing sheets have the capacity to cover large areas dependent on the size selected and are often chosen due to their protective attributes and lightweight properties. From a cosmetic point of view, galvanised roofing sheets offer something more traditional. Galvanised roofing sheets are also considered to be very cost effective.


Onduline is a branded bituminous corrugated roofing sheeting solution that is renowned for being extremely hard-wearing, insulating and lightweight. The base of Onduline is composed of recycled cellulose fibres, saturated in bitumen. A widely recognised and respected product by professionals around the globe, typical applications of Onduline include stables and agricultural buildings, but the roofing sheets can also be used with sheds and garages too.


Coroline corrugated roofing is typically used as a solution by enthusiasts in lower-key DIY applications such as sheds and garages. Coroline is also often used in the building of animal houses due to its resistance to environmental factors, decent sound absorption and good insulation properties. Add into the bargain, its cost effectiveness and it’s not hard to see why it’s a popular solution amongst DIYers.


Corrugated polycarbonate roofing offers damage and impact resistance as well as excellent structural durability. These sheets are often selected as a solution in projects requiring roof or side light due to their high light transmission properties and are typically used in projects involving greenhouses, carports and even gazebos and patio canopies.

Types of Corrugated Roofing and their Uses

At eRoofs, we offer many types of corrugated roofing, so that no matter your project or your budget, you’ll never be short of the best materials. To kick off your corrugated roofing project, head on over to eRoofs now!

onduline roofing

Dos and Don’ts: Installing Onduline Roofing

Onduline roofing is a popular choice for application in both DIY and professional grade projects. With a history of over 70 years, Onduline has achieved its favoured name as the result of being subject to some serious rigorous testing and development.

What is Onduline Roofing?

For those unfamiliar, Onduline roofing is a bituminous corrugated roofing solution. The roofing sheets are composed of a single layer of organic fibres, melded with bitumen through an intensive pressure and heat process – giving the final product a highly durable finish.
Onduline roofing is often the first material of choice by enthusiasts and professionals due to its weatherproof qualities – a properly fitted sheet is expected to last for fifteen years!

Of course, if Onduline roofing isn’t applied in the correct way, then sheeting may not stand up to the test of time quite so long. We share our top tips to ensure you get the best out of your Onduline roofing purchases:

Get Your Measurements Right

Onduline roofing only comes in one length – 2m x 0.95m – so your first port of call should be to ensure that you have enough material for the job. Of course sheets can be cut, but there’s a minimum requirement for overhang (70mm at the eaves) and pitching (5 degrees.)

Ensure You Have the Right Accessories

At eRoofs, we recommend a minimum of 30 fixings per sheet – so it serves well to have a little in reserve. It’s also a good idea to use the Onduline branded fixings – these have been designed specifically for Onduline roofing applications – and they’re available in a colour to match your chosen roofing colour.

You’ll likely also want to cut your sheeting to size – for this, power tools are the preference, such as a circular saw (coarse blade.) If you don’t have an appropriate power tool to hand, then a well-oiled coarse tooth manual hand saw should do the trick.

Install Your Sheets in the Right Conditions

Bitumen by its nature is prone to softening up under high temperatures. Therefore, it’s recommended against installing bitumen on a hot summer’s day. If the temperature is approaching 35 degrees Celsius – hold off until things cool down. The likelihood is if it’s that hot in the UK, it probably won’t rain any time soon anyway!

Buying Onduline Roofing

Onduline roofing is a great solution for any DIY project. When implemented correctly, roofing can last over a decade – making it a worthy investment. To start your next roofing project, head on over to eRoofs to browse our selection of Onduline.

What are your top tips for installing Onduline roofing? Share with us in the comments below!